Wednesday, 16 September 2020

Podcast: Lost and (not) Found

What does it mean when we lose something and why are some of us better at finding things than others?

We define the concept of losing something and discuss different heuristics, strategies and technologies that have developed to help us find things. We also mention the psychological impact of losing something, how much time we spend looking for stuff and consider why some people may be better predisposed to locate misplaced objects.

A few things we mentioned in this podcast:

Find more Cognitive Engineering episodes here https://link.chtbl.com/SQeIgc44

Wednesday, 9 September 2020

Podcast: Declining Fertility

Recent research suggests there will be a significant reduction in the birth rate over the course of the next century. What would this mean if it were true? 

In this podcast we discuss the accuracy of population forecasts, the assumptions they are based on, and the relationship between the number of people and factors such as productivity and societal innovation. We also attempt to predict some of the implications of an aging population with fewer children and ask whether there is an optimal number of human beings.

A few things we mentioned in this podcast:

BBC coverage of declining fertility  

The ‘Lump of Labour’ fallacy 

Derek Parfit’s repugnant conclusion 

Find more Cognitive Engineering episodes here https://link.chtbl.com/SQeIgc44

Wednesday, 2 September 2020

Podcast: Toast and Marmot

With a case of the bubonic plague being contracted in Mongolia after consumption of a wild marmot, we consider whether disgust at certain foodstuffs serves a protective purpose.

We all experience disgust, but do we really think about it? In our latest podcast, we list some of the more disgusting foods we've come across while discussing why we find somethings more repugnant than others.

A few things we mentioned in this podcast:



Find more Cognitive Engineering episodes here https://link.chtbl.com/SQeIgc44

Thursday, 27 August 2020

Podcast: Don't Buy the Album

In the age of music streaming, does the idea of an album make sense any more?

In this podcast we discuss the conceptual origins of the album and talk about the implications of its evolution from vinyl, to tape and CD, and finally to the cloud. We also touch on the artistic purpose of an album, and whether this has been destroyed or merely altered by the move to digital streaming. Fundamentally, we question the purpose of an album and whether it still has meaning.

A few things we mentioned in this podcast:



Find more Cognitive Engineering episodes here https://link.chtbl.com/SQeIgc44

Wednesday, 19 August 2020

Podcast: Dispensing Wisdom

 “Advice is a dangerous gift, even from the wise to the wise” - so definitely don’t listen to us, as we discuss what to do with others’ wisdom.

In this podcast we explore the value of intergenerational advice, whether age equates to wisdom and what makes someone receptive to advice, regardless of its quality. We also address the areas in which people seek advice and how this has altered over time. 

A few things we mentioned in this podcast:

Find more Cognitive Engineering episodes here https://link.chtbl.com/SQeIgc44

Wednesday, 12 August 2020

Podcast: Storm in a Teacup

An American makes tea badly and suddenly the British are up in arms. What does the way you make tea tell someone about you? 

This podcast addresses the information we obtain from little shibboleths such as making tea, and discusses whether it is accurate, valid and useful. Does it merely foster class and cultural exclusion, or do these ceremonies and their preservation still serve a valuable social purpose?

A few things we mentioned in this podcast:

Find more Cognitive Engineering episodes here https://link.chtbl.com/SQeIgc44



Wednesday, 5 August 2020

Podcast: High Anxiety

With our current pandemic related concerns, we seem to have forgotten about other scary things, like terrorism or environmental catastrophe. Should we be concerned by our lack of worry?

We discuss whether we worry about the right things, whether we are worrying less than we used to and whether worry can even be accurately measured. What is the right amount to worry and what is the purpose of worrying? Does it serve a rational function?

Things mentioned in this podcast:





Find more Cognitive Engineering episodes here https://link.chtbl.com/SQeIgc44