Friday, 15 July 2016

Podcast: Brexit and Referenda

In the wake of the Brexit vote, Peter, Nick and Fraser discuss what referendums can tell us, and what technology means for democracy. To subscribe to the podcast, add this RSS feed to your preferred player. http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:219479129/sounds.rss

3 comments:

Dr G said...

Hello Pete, Nick; hope all is well.
Just a quick note to ask about your header of 'cognitive engineering' - was that intentional, as it that is already a domain of work (in Human Factors, which is again often misunderstood - https://www.hfes.org/Web/AboutHFES/about.html)

Some bits and bobs on Cognitive Engineering:
https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-oxford-handbook-of-cognitive-engineering-9780199757183?cc=gb&lang=en&#
https://www.hfes.org/Publications/ProductDetail.aspx?ProductID=64
https://www.hfes.org/web/PubPages/JCEDM_Endsley.pdf

If you are venturing into this area, would be keen to know more!

Gareth

Nick Hare said...

We are aware of the collection of fields sometimes labelled 'cognitive engineering' but we're not using it solely in that specific sense. More widely: how should one use one's brain to form accurate beliefs about the world and make better decisions? Taking an engineering approach to belief and decision, in other words; developing the theory in abstract, looking at the data, finding things that seem to work, and testing them, and so on. I don't think there is likely to be much confusion given the context.

Dr G said...

Very good.... Just to elaborate, HF is multidisciplinary (with Engineering a key part), so it still might be worth looking at it. It also focuses (especially the JCEDM journal) on research in the 'field' (rather than laboratories) to develop descriptive (rather than normative) models of how professionals (rather than students) really do cognitive tasks (rather than abstract 'toy' tasks). It's therefore a lot more useful than most journals looking at judgement / decision making. It might be of interest to you?